CIC Library

CIC Library

 

Follow this resource for creating a Works Cited list (also known as a bibliography) and correctly citing quotations within the text of a research paper or project


- Referencing: general principles & MLA examples

- Bibliography generator

 

Plagiarism


Plagiarism is the use and presentation of another person’s work (thoughts, words, ideas or opinions) as one’s own work. It is a form of cheating. It is dishonest. Though plagiarism is a moral issue, there can also be legal consequences. Many universities and colleges have a zero tolerance policy regarding plagiarism with the consequence of expulsion for those who practice it. People who break copyright may also be legally charged and convicted of intellectual theft.

 

Academic Honesty

 

As set forth in both the CIC and IB mission statements, part of becoming a globally-minded, responsible citizen of the world is the ability to develop and cultivate a set of values and ethics that are based on honesty, diligence and respect. The International Baccalaureate Organization defines academic integrity as “a set of values that promotes personal integrity in examinations, the authenticity of work and intellectual property rights. It is a belief, and as such is influenced by the school’s values, peer culture and parental pressure” (Academic honesty: guidance for schools, IBO, September 2003). Consequently, all students at CIC are expected to maintain the highest of ethical standards in completing their assignments and acknowledging their sources.

 

CIC has adopted the MLA style of citation for use in all classes for all research papers/projects. The MLA style guide was created in 1883 by a group of teachers and scholars called the Modern Language Association of America. The style of documentation is used widely by high schools, colleges, and universities in the United States and around the world, especially for papers in English and the Humanities.

MLA Reference Guide

MLA Reference Guide